Art and Science on the Go - Past Programs

The below programs are no longer open for registration, but may come back in improved form in the near future.

Winter 2013
E (motion)

Kinetic art exists where art, design and engineering converge. During E (motion), students will uncover the many forms that kinetic art takes while exploring the physics behind the movement. The importance of classification in the arts and sciences will allow students to understand the distinctions between art and design (and where those lines blur) as well as the interactions of forces and transformations of energy that take place in these works. Students will have access to several hands-on demonstrations and will create a “bristlebot” to be used in the creation of their own kinetic art.

During this one hour program, students will:

  • Distinguish between fine and commercial art and design.
  • Demonstrate differences between potential, kinetic, and other forms of energy.
  • Recognize balanced and unbalanced forces in kinetic art, including wood automatons.
  • Identify key contributors in the development of kinetic art.
  • Apply Newton’s Laws of Motion and creative problem solving to create kinetic art.

This one hour program is designed for students in grades 6-8 and is closely aligned with Michigan Science and Art GLCEs, Common Core Math State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards. The program will only be offered October 2013 through January 2014 and spaces are limited. Programs are presented to groups no larger than 32 students at a time and can be repeated multiple times in a day.

Brochure
Standards and Further Information 

 


Spring 2013Change / React

Change/React, an investigation of how artists and scientists recognize and respond to change, was presented February 2013 - May 2013, thanks to a grant from The Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation.

Why have winters changed in Michigan? How do you stabilize a damaged painting? Both climatologists and art conservators face questions about how to respond to changes both to and from the environment. Through a generous grant from the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation, Cranbrook Art and Science on the Go presents a free, cross-curricular program on how people in the arts and sciences recognize and respond to change.

During this one hour program, students will:

  • Explore evidence of past rapid changes to Earth’s climate
  • Find how resulting climate models can help determine the human impact on current climate
  • Take on the role of art conservators to collect information and weigh risk in determining how to stabilize a work of art
  • Interpret art as responses to environmental changes
  • Find ways to respond to their findings through local solutions and means of expression

This one hour program is designed for students in grades 6-8 and is closely aligned with Michigan science, math and art GLCEs, Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards. The program will only be offered February 2013 through May 2013 to northern lower-penninsula Michigan schools and spaces are limited. Programs are presented to groups no larger than 30 students at a time and can be repeated multiple times in a day.

Brochure


Winter 2012

Reflect on This
Reflect on This, an investigation of light, color and the creative process in the arts and sciences, was presented October 2012 - January 2013, thanks to a grant from The Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation.

 During the 45-minute program, middle school students will:

  • Practice techniques to help problem solve and think creatively
  • Use hands on activities to explore the wave nature of light and how this understanding allows us to manipulate light and color
  • Understand the steps of the creative process by building a simple light sculpture with provided materials
  • Identify parallels between the next generation scientific practices and the creative process
  • Explore the transmission, reflection, diffraction and refraction of light through use of the materials
  • Use light to understand additive/subtractive color theory and how colors are perceived
  • If time permits, examine the visual perception of our environment and how the eye and mind can be fooled

Brochure
Further Information


Spring 2012

copper in michigan

Cu in Michigan
, Cranbrook Art and Science on the Go’s first outreach program, was presented for free to middle school students in northern Michigan from January - April, 2012, thanks to a grant from The Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation.

During the 45-minute program, middle school students will experience

  • Discovery of common features between art and science.
  • Hands-on examination of metals found in northern Michigan, including copper, iron, and silver.
  • Determining the physical and chemical properties of these metals to discover which characteristics are common and unique to each.
  • Applying their understanding of these properties to choose different metals to complete a metalpoint project.

  • Investigate native tool-making techniques using copper.
  • Renown works of art from the Cranbrook Art Museum and examples from the Cranbrook Art Academy that utilize metals.
  • Several of the most beautiful and unique mineral formations and metal artifacts from Cranbrook Institute of Science’s world-class collection.
  • Application of their knowledge to complete a project using copper and pigments taken from oxidized metals.
  • Investigations into how these minerals were mined in Michigan and with the engineering and social challenges that came with it.


Brochure
Further Information, including GLCEs
Pre/Post activities